Creamy Pumpkin Soup

Updated: Feb 2, 2021

In addition to beta carotene, pumpkins offer vitamin C, vitamin E, iron, and folate -- all of which strengthen your immune system. More pumpkin in your diet can help your immune cells work better to ward off germs and speed healing when you get a wound.


One cup of cooked pumpkin (245 grams) contains (2):

  • Calories: 49

  • Fat: 0.2 grams

  • Protein: 2 grams

  • Carbs: 12 grams

  • Fiber: 3 grams

  • Vitamin A: 245% of the Reference Daily Intake (RDI)

  • Vitamin C: 19% of the RDI

  • Potassium: 16% of the RDI

  • Copper: 11% of the RDI

  • Manganese: 11% of the RDI

  • Vitamin B2: 11% of the RDI

  • Vitamin E: 10% of the RDI

  • Iron: 8% of the RDI

  • Small amounts of magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, folate and several B vitamins.

Besides being packed with vitamins and minerals, pumpkin is also relatively low in calories, as it’s 94% water.

It’s also very high in beta-carotene, a carotenoid that your body turns into vitamin A.

Moreover, pumpkin seeds are edible, nutritious and linked to numerous health benefits.


Antioxidant


Pumpkins contain antioxidants, such as alpha-carotene, beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin. These can neutralize free radicals, stopping them from damaging your cells